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Ann Clin Neurophysiol > Volume 3(1); 2001 > Article
Ann Clin Neurophysiol. 2001; 3(1): 37-39.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis combined with Hashimoto's thyroiditis : A case report
Yung-Chai Ko, Sung-Soo Kang, Young-Bae Lee, Hyeon-MI Park, and Dong-Jin Shin
Copyright © 2001 The Korean Society of Clinical Neurophysiology
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
ABSTRACT
Although the etiology and pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS) in unknown, increasing evidence support a role autoimmune machanisms in motor neuron degeneration. The coexistence of immune disease in ALS supports that an altered immune system may contribute to disease pathogenesis. A 55-year-old woman was admitted to our department due to dysarthria and gait disturbance. On physical and neurologic examination, she showed thyroid enlargement, tongue atrophy, muscle weakness, fasciculation, and increased deep tendon reflex. The electrophysiological studies are compatible with motor neuron disease. Cytological findings of thyroid were compatible with hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thus, we report a case of ALS combined with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. And the simultaneous presentation with ALS and Hashimoto's thyroiditis led us to consider whether this was simply a chance association or not.
Key words: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis(ALS), Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Autoimmune disease
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